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20110701
20110731
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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
from the marketing department of a multi-billion dollars organization that really has a big financial stake in the future of books. it's important to remember that if someone has a future that completely and 100% is tied up in e-books, they will try to figure the book in the state of the book is all about e-books. now, in order to try to separate the rhetoric from the reality of simba information on with our parent company, we put together a nationally representative u.s. consumer survey. and we wanted to go to the entire u.s. adult population and basically ask who is buying these things anyway. do you buy e-books? what devices on which do you become how many books do you buy and so forth? and over the three-year period we've been collecting data and we have begun collecting it quarterly for our three e-book publishing 2011 report, we found that about 90% of the u.s. adult population hasn't bought a single solitary digital book. not a single e-book. we also found that because we asked questions that print book buyer still outnumber e-book buyers, about five to one. and the other thing
of its reputation now. think of the vonnegut books and the books that were big in the '60s and '70s if you're old enough to have been around then. very different books now. malcolm muckeridge marshall mcclewin. i'm in the ms today. [laughter] cultural superstars then, and they don't show up now. so that's, i think, the first thing. the other thing is the biography of a person, you dig into letters, you dig into reminiscences and so on. here you have mainly a narrative of where it's gone, what's happened to it along the way. and it was such a delightful concept that when i met the other authors and like to tell them about who some of these authors are or what they're going to write about because that gives you a sense of where you can take this, the diversity that's been going on. >> the other two books that have already been published in the series, one is a biography of augustin's confession by gary wells who has, of course, written about augustin several times during his career. and then this is a biography of the tibetan book of the dead by donald lopez who's up at the university
, the social security benefits drop 22%. that's a big hit for folks that are living on social security. so what can we do today, 25 years in advance, what small thing can we do today to social security which will build up the solvency and life of social security for even more years? that's a -- i think that's an honest challenge and we should view it as an honest challenge. not to eliminate social security but to say to the generation of younger workers in america, it's going to be there and you'll be darn lucky that it is there because a lot of seniors today can tell you the story of their lives paying into social security. they now receive the benefits. but what happened to their other plans for retirement? well, that little 401(k), that ira, that s.e.p. plan took a hit a few years ago, lost about 30% of its value. and for many americans with pension plans where their work, some of those companies went out of business and walked away from those pension obligations. social security has been there. we want it to be there in the future. so we can find ways to strengthen social security and give
and virginia is the big exception to this because they are the ones as john pointed out that established religious freedom, separation of church and state and so forth. if you look at these stasis constitutions and i don't have a political ax to grind, but it fascinates me that almost all of them have very, very specific religious christian, if not protestant qualifications for holding office so you have pennsylvania, for example, the most radical democratic constitution of them all, and in order to serve the government in pennsylvania, you have to uphold the devine inspiration of the old and new testaments. you know, you have to believe in a god. vermont is the one i love. 177 # -- 1776 constitution of the independence of vermont, now this bashing of liberalism, upholds the idea all people serving in government must believe in the inspiration of the devine old and new testaments, obey the sabbath, and be a protestant, catholics, jews, forget about it. they can't serve in government. it's referred to as a federalist argument; right? at what -- did the constitution leave religion out beca
and a big part of this community. i was grateful to see him here today before i turn over to arianna who i think is an expert on journalism and editorial, i want to go through a few points of real big things that we're betting on as a company, not talk about aol but let's talk about the things we see in the future and why we're putting such an investment in journalism. number one question i get from wall street all the time is why journalism, why are you choosing when the rest of the world seems to be going away from journalism? why are you opening up a thousand patches? why did you buy the "huffington post"? and i think the things i'm about to talk about are a core essence of what we believe them. the first is really a bit of the human needs stage which is, if you woke up and today was your first day on planet earth, what would you knows and what would you see? i think there's some very stark things. one is there's four or 5 billion phones in peoples pockets and a lot of smart phone growth across the world, which means people are going to be connected full-time with information all the ti
industry. >> i'm glad you asked that. this is a big subject in the book. one of the things that interested me very deeply was that in addition to being the first war to have destructiveness at this level, the first world war was the first propaganda war. why? because up to that point in time in europe in the proceeding several decades, all the wars had been fairly small war colonial conflicts where small volunteer armies went out and put down rebellions in africa or asia or whatever. it didn't require a propaganda effort. you know, certain writers like roger kipling could be counted on to supply the proper kind of poetry and story telling when needed to be, but there wasn't anything organized by the government, but right from the beginning, they seemed to realize that this war was going to require a massive propaganda effort. this was especially true in england, and it was another reason that led me to concentrate on england in the book because along the major powers of europe, they did not have conscription. they still had an all-volunteer army, so whipping up the necessary enthusiasm, th
-30 years ago and think of its reputation now. think of the books that were big in the 60s and 70s, if you're old enough to have been around then, they are very different books now. herbert and marshall and the coastal superstars then, and they don't show up now. that's, i think, the first thing. the other thing is biography of a person, you dig into letters. you dig into rem innocences and -- rem remanents and so on. this was just a delightful concept when i met the other authors and they told me about who the authors are and what they write about. that gives you a sense where to take this diversity of what's going on. >> so the other two books already published in this series, one is a biography of a confession by gary wills who has, of course, wrote about this several times during his career, and then this is a biography of the book of the dead by donald lopez up at the university of michigan. each of them treats this idea in each of the three in a different way, and still and some of the books that are still to come in this series also promise to be very interesting, and vie -- vanessa
state constitutions, and virginia is the big exception to this because they're the ones, as john just pointed out, established religious freedom, separation of church and state and so forth. if you look at these state constitutions, though, and, you know, i don't have a political axe to grind on this question, but it does fascinate me that almost all of them have very, very specific religious, christian if not protestant qualifications for holding office. so you have pennsylvania, for example. the most radical, democratic constitution of them all. in order to serve the government in pennsylvania, you have to uphold the divine inspiration of the old and new testaments. you know, you have to believe in a god. vermont is the one i love. 177 -- as a historian at least, right? 1776 constitution of the independent state of vermont, you know, today this bastion of kind of secular liberalism upholds the idea that, you know, all people serving in government must believe in the inspiration of -- divine inspiration of the old and new testaments, obey the soundness and be a protestant. so you've
, south carolina, utah and i am leaving out north carolina and illinois because those are the big jackpot states with a really driving party potential for gain. than i have a question mark as far as which party is going to gain a seat or lose a seat and it could be a fair fight in states like iowa, new jersey and arizona are go but i'm sure the five states we'll be talking a lot about this morning and i will stop short in going on depth in this are illinois and north carolina which are opportunities for partisan capitalization on this redistricting. illinois for democrats picking up potential a five or six seats or four or five seats republicans losing five or six and illinois. north carolina where i put republican gains have possibly three seats be the -- depending on the legal challenge to the mass republicans are proposing and then california where he think democrats at the end of the day will probably pick up two or three seats as a result of the entangling of california's uncompetitive line at the moment. texas where i expect republicans netting two seats depending on the legal chall
health centers that will determine it for the long-term the factors that will do with big diseases under two prevent them and teacher than. now, we have noted with the prime minister and we worked all weekend on this, that different choices that we did following an independent jury, forgot cancer, or didn't deal with cancer. that was the rule. you go for excellence, you go for international juries. we cannot change the decision of these juries, otherwise what use would that be? i mean, the selection process has to be respected. but we thought that it was impossible not to have hospital institutes dealing with cancer. and so we have asked others, seeing the second stage of the cancer plan and what the national institute for cancer is doing to make proposal on the specific question of cancer. in order to have a dedicated university hospital center. at the beginning of july, we're going to announce the first selection of these excellence initiatives, 7.7 billion euros. the winners will be the beginning of the major sites for french scientific research, not all universities will be part and
are prone to violence but have reported side to them. can you just -- >> yes. there was a big part of his persona. he wrote poetry. he was always described in personal dealings with him as generally considered far from as screen. not a pleasant person. is not a pleasant person to be a round ball. much more rigid, much more didactic. mind you, we're talking about the characters, somebody who planned to 9/11. that didn't want to push that went too far. in portraying osama bin laden it was important to get him right in see him as his acolyte who is going to put his life on the line for this plot would see him as an inspirational figure. that only makes sense because you're not seeing him when you are the reader. you aren't seeing him through the americans what do you been seeing it to the point of view of someone who is actually experiencing and has been inspired by him. you want to understand how that could possibly be. >> one of the things your characters from the west german least seven common is that they are having to use different identities. he has to change its name. the characters a
glad you asked that. this is a big subject in my book. one of the things that interests me very deeply was that in addition to being the first war to have destructiveness that this technological level, the first world war was really the pursed propaganda war. why? because up to that point in time in europe and the preceding several decades all the wars have been small-scale colonial conflicts where small volunteer armies, you know, germans, frenchmen, and was men went out and put down colonial rebellions in africa, asia, concord new colonies. it did not require a propaganda effort. you know, certain riders like rudyard kipling to be counted on for supply of the proper kind of poetry and story telling and so forth. there wasn't anything organized by the government by the government. right from the beginning they seem to realize that this war was going to require a massive propaganda effort. this was especially true of england, and it was another reason that led me to concentrate on england in this book. alone of the major powers in europe britain did not have conscription. they had stil
-- are hardly think people were that surprised. >> your resignation -- one of the big issues is the question of morale. are stopped last week by an officer who described embarrassment to senior police. a real concern about more route or a number of changes and there are number of rules. you're the first to clean this up on the more outside. and what they can do to restore that? >> us support public and private messages -- i will be doing that before i go. i had spoken to many police officers since my resignation. they spoke about their pride even though they don't feel they could walk away with it might interfere with their discharges in a few years so in a similar way in many areas of the organization there is great pride. what are point to is we have to restore some confidence. it is about -- we do have to make sure the meeting doesn't restore the public's fairness around this one hacking issue. >> i want to take you back to your resignation statement where you stated you had no reason to suspect involvement in phone hacking. no reason or no knowledge of the expense of the disgraceful prac
a very conventional life in ohio, big brood of kids. involved in church causes but she was part of one of, she was maybe the most interesting person to me in some ways because she really struggled to negotiate between her children, even as her views were being challenged. >> so talk about norman and walkers through the real crises the brothers faced as a question of service was engaged. >> norman became a pacifist in the 1960s, or right before the united states entered the war and he became involved in some organizations, antiwar organizations. that was sort of the very structure that would become the aclu after the war. [inaudible] he sort of started working, they went through political channels and also kind of grassroots organizations. and evan didn't believe in politics. and he just wanted -- he had kind of a martyr streak. he decided to come back to the united states and take a stand. ralph really heated wilson's call for a fight for freedom and are the kind of what whether this or whether to become an officer. ended up he wanted to become a fighter pilot. [inaudible] >> arthur was m
you asked that next. this is big subject of my book. one of the things that interested me very deeply was that in addition to being the first war to have, you know, destructiveness of this technological level, the first world war was really the first propaganda war. why? because up to that point in time in europe, in the preceding several decades all the wars had been fairly small-scale colonial conflicts where small volunteer armies, you know, of germans, french men, english men, went out and put down colonial rebellions in africa or asia or conquered new colonies in africa or whatever. it didn't require a propaganda effort. certain writers like rudyard kipling could be counted on to supply the proper kind of story telling and poetry when needed but there wasn't anything organized by the government. but, right from the beginning they seemed to realize that this war was going to require a massive propaganda effort. this was especially true in england and it was another reason that led me to concentrate on england in this book because alone of the major powers in europe britain did not
 there is a big enough -- there is a big enough, you know, slow groundswell out there that it reacts with journalists. deeply younger and younger editors in charge with less and less background, with n controls around them. as long as the profits are coming in, it's a river of go >> i would agree with toby elliott because this is not the failure of the press completely. there is a culture, which allowed a sword at cheeky he to get completely out of control and brake or troll barn side of the law. >> the guardian others indeed have lots of other generous actually took seven years and not to expose her. so you know, do we get these? i would say they generally are good to read. >> i think it is important to say that we look at the certain part of the press suggest that the press. you have to look across the media. the media as a whole is fantastically mixed. we have lots and lots of forecast in print and online, phenomenal stuff. and if you look a
that he likes to call a big deal. anyone who's looked at the figures knows that it isn't. but the larger point here is that the american people have already won this debate. no one, not even the president, can claim to support the status quo anymore, even when in fact he does. but of course winning the debate isn't nearly as important as achieving the reforms that are needed to convince the world that we're actually serious about getting our fiscal house in order. that's why republicans continue to hold out for significant reforms and that's why we'll continue to fight for serious long-term reforms this week. republicans have tried to persuade the president of the need for a serious course correction, but weeks of negotiations have shown that his commitment to big government is simply too great to lead to the kind of long-term reforms we need to put us on a path to both balance and economic growth. so we've decideed to bring our case to the american people. the president recently cited a poll that suggests americans want to see balance in this debate. i'd point him to another poll showin
question was at the time you guys took the survey, the big concern was unit cohesion disruption. in the process of training, which was having no problems, has there been any indication that separate or different from what we talked about in that survey that once we pass training and pass the repeal and this really starts and open services allowed, they will be unit cohesion coin-operated onto the combat. >> as the service chiefs have received information from their leadership, their change of command to include combat areas over the last six months, there has been no distractions from unit cohesion that have been reported. so it has been very, very positive. the information has come from the leadership in this building. >> the obama administration has said they are no longer appealing challenges to doma. if doma were to fall in a circuit court and only partially, you know, be invalidated for a portion of the country, would you have contingency plans to extend benefits to military families, things like military families in those areas? >> well, and my understanding of the adminis
property. i don't think i would comment beyond that. >> big publisher of poems repress, thank you for a few minutes . . who remembers as a girl she lived next door to a lithuanian jewish family. she recalls she would call for young josephine to turn the light on for her. 60 years later you could hear the pride in her voice being called upon for that task. it's probable families living in our tenement open until the year 1935 discussed or of mitered norman thomas. tonight we are pleased to discuss his life and work with louisa thomas d. author of conscience. she will be signing copies of the book after the topic and keep in mind when you buy a book your supporting the author, the publisher and the museum. if you choose to become a member this evening, we will give you a complimentary copy of conscience. tonight's conversation is led by john mechem, executive editor and vice president of random house. a former editor of newsweek and pulitzer prize-winning author and commentator on politics,?g?g history and religious base in?gg america and is editor of our jeg public media and contributor tog
. speaker, in this debate, let us not lose sight of the big picture. the people who send us here want some pretty straightforward things. they want their media free and punchy but they want them within the law. they want their police independent and strong but honest and incorruptible. and they want their politicians to sort out a mess that has socked their faith in the key institutions in our country. we should be clear today that we will not let them down. >> here, here! >> order, the question is this house have considered the matter of public confidence in the media and the police. mr. ed miliband. >> mr. speaker, i welcome this debate and i think in starting this debate all of us should remember what brings us here. because parliament would not have been recalled today if it had not been for the revelations by the hacking of millie doweler's phone. that revelation shocked our country and turned something that had seemed to be about the lives of politicians, footballers and celebrities into something very different. about the lives of others who never sought the public eye. and it is th
at this if there is evidence of illegal activity than big questions have to be answered and i am sure the leader of the opposition will ask those questions and make sure -- >> were there any meetings between neil wallace and mr. coulson when he was working for the prime minister at number 10 downing street? >> i don't have that information. far worse for me to give an answer that could turn out to be inaccurate. i will get back to you with that information. >> members on this side are right. want as to move on from excessive focus on this issue but are ask the prime minister how he is able to end the practice of journalism regularly paying police officers for a quick scooped? >> we need to do a number of things. the police investigation into corruption which is overseen by someone on the outside and work to improve the ethics and standards but also there will be the inquiry which will do a job of working on this on the panel of the former chief constable, understanding how the police service works and we can deal with this problem. >> i feel confident in the police being affected by allegations
production order. it is the lot about a big corporation which -- whatever it is, that is a lot. [talking over each other] >> you previously had to go through another investigation and pursued a very sorrow and robust investigation. can you explain the difference there and the difference here? >> if i can. it is a matter of coming up with the evidence that we should have had in 2005/6 and in 2009. that has resulted in a huge investigation that they will be thinking about which is following the evidence. we simply were not provided that material when we should have been. >> how the wait until the evidence in this scandal -- you were not able to do so? >> there were a lot of inquiries. i am sure a lot of them now. there were a number. [inaudible] >> the process is not followed yet and the evidence -- never been criticized for in number of causes but that is -- >> i am going to hand you a list of names of all the guardian blog that sets out a number of people who have been warned by operations concerning the fact that their homes have been -- i want you to look at it and to see whether or not you
. it gives us the view point of hitler and his generals. and andrew is trying to answer the really big question that has haunted historians and many others for the last 70 years. why did germany lose the war? was it the superiority of th allied powers? or was it strategic errors on hitler's part? in fact, with all of hitler's advantages how could he have possibly ever lost this war? andrew roberts' great contribution is to let us participate, in effect, in a grand strategy course centered upon hitler and his generals. of all the books that have been published on world war ii, none before have viewed it from this perspective alone. it is an absolutely intriguing story, and i urge you all to get yourself a copy. surprisingly, there are copies for sale in the corner on the left here. but first, before you rush out to buy this copy, first, a few words from the great historian himself. and, yes, he does turn out to be a young one. andrew roberts. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, it's a great honor to be invited to address you this owning, and -- this evening, and thank you very much inde
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)